12 Reasons to Consider Dropbox Paper for Project Management

Joe Martin
12 min readFeb 3, 2020

I have Mig Reyes to thank for first introducing me to Dropbox Paper. Early on, I used it like an internal Wiki and a replacement to Evernote. It felt like a convenient spot to keep notes, which I then began to share with other people on my team.

Which, I know, was super annoying.
Nobody likes the guy who keeps trying to introduce a new software saying “seriously! This will make everything easier.”
But—that…that was me.

As a fan of Medium.com’s interface, Dropbox Paper worked very much in the same way. Like a better Microsoft Word. Only instead of giving you MySpace like freedom, Paper only provides you with a limited amount of customization options.

Which is totally acceptable! You don’t need to change the font to Papyrus, make it 64pt, and put it in a different color, Michael Scott.
Take it easy!

Basic visual hierarchy will do. We’re just trying to communicate a message here. The document should tell me what I need to know. As quickly as possible. So I can stop reading. the. damn. document. you sent me. and get back to work.

A background in conversion-based copywriting pushed me to look at new ways to communicate

I started to take all of the principles from conversion-based copywriting for marketing, and use them for internal communication.

The most significant principle in conversion-based copywriting — get to the point. Tell the reader what they need to know, why it’s important to them, and move on. No witty taglines, no rhetorical questions — facts.

When it started to work well for communication with my team, now I wanted to see if I could take it one step further. If I could use these same principles for client communication.

This is where I first started to use Paper for client interaction. And these are the 12 things I found.

1) An open infrastructure lets you customize large & small projects

It’s the designer in me that loves Dropbox paper.

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Joe Martin

Entrepreneur, author, and TEDx Speaker who believes real world interactions are more valuable than digital ones.